Picture of person typing on laptop with programming code visible on the laptop screen

World class computing and information science research at Strathclyde...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Department of Computer & Information Sciences involved in mathematically structured programming, similarity and metric search, computer security, software systems, combinatronics and digital health.

The Department also includes the iSchool Research Group, which performs leading research into socio-technical phenomena and topics such as information retrieval and information seeking behaviour.

Explore

Prediction method for the fundamental radial mode of multi-mode motors

Puccio, J.J. and Gatzoulis, L. and O'Leary, R.L. and Hayward, G. (2004) Prediction method for the fundamental radial mode of multi-mode motors. In: 2004 IEEE Ultrasonics Symposium, 2004-08-23 - 2004-08-27.

Full text not available in this repository. Request a copy from the Strathclyde author

Abstract

Ultrasonic motors often use a combination of vibration modes to create the elliptical vibration field desired for motion. The efficiency of multi-mode motors is maximised when the various modes are complementary to each other. However, design optimisation is not straightforward, as multiple mode coupling can lead to catastrophic failure of the intended mechanism. This paper presents a method for the theoretical optimisation of ultrasonic motors that employ a radial and a bending mode. The method is based on a finite element approach to estimate the radial mode frequency that is best matched to a bending mode frequency derived from an analytical formula. The proposed method overcomes the dimensional limitations of formulae currently available for the calculation of radial frequencies of piezoceramic rings. This approach has been applied to motor designs of different materials and dimensions, and has been shown to provide a useful tool for decreasing the amount of speculation and maximising the efficiency of multi-mode motor designs