Picture of person typing on laptop with programming code visible on the laptop screen

World class computing and information science research at Strathclyde...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Department of Computer & Information Sciences involved in mathematically structured programming, similarity and metric search, computer security, software systems, combinatronics and digital health.

The Department also includes the iSchool Research Group, which performs leading research into socio-technical phenomena and topics such as information retrieval and information seeking behaviour.

Explore

Agreement between skinfold-predicted percent fat and percent fat from whole-body bioelectrical impedance analysis in children and youth

Rowe, D.A. and DuBose, K. and Donnelly, J. and Mahar, M. (2006) Agreement between skinfold-predicted percent fat and percent fat from whole-body bioelectrical impedance analysis in children and youth. International Journal of Pediatric Obesity, 1 (3). pp. 168-175. ISSN 1747-7166

Full text not available in this repository. Request a copy from the Strathclyde author

Abstract

Purpose. The purpose of the study was to determine the agreement of percent body fat estimates and obesity classification derived via whole-body bioelectrical impedance analysis (%BF-BIA) with percent body fat estimates and obesity classification from skinfolds (%BF-SF) in children and adolescents. Methods. BIA and SF data were collected on 609 boys and 645 girls aged 7 to 14 years. Results. Although moderate correlations were observed between the measures, Bland-Altman analyses revealed fixed and proportional bias, and 95% limits of agreement covered a range of over 20%BF. Agreement of obesity classification was moderately high in boys (κq=0.77) and girls (κq=0.81), but fewer children were classified as obese via %BF-BIA (14.5%) than via %BF-SF (19.8%). Conclusions. The results indicate that whole-body BIA provides %BF estimates that are systematically different from %BF estimates from skinfolds in children and adolescents.