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The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Department of Computer & Information Sciences involved in mathematically structured programming, similarity and metric search, computer security, software systems, combinatronics and digital health.

The Department also includes the iSchool Research Group, which performs leading research into socio-technical phenomena and topics such as information retrieval and information seeking behaviour.

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Simulation of monolithic active pixels in deep sub-micron technologies

Manolopoulos, S and Mathieson, K and Turchetta, R (2002) Simulation of monolithic active pixels in deep sub-micron technologies. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment, 487 (1-2). pp. 181-187. ISSN 0168-9002

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Abstract

The use of monolithic active pixels (MAPS) has quickly spread in a number of scientific fields ranging from imaging to high-energy particle physics applications. The success of MAPS is due to a number of reasons, for example their low power consumption, fast readout, high spatial resolution and low cost. The latter reflects the use of standard CMOS processes for fabrication. In this paper, the performance of MAPS designed in 0.25 mm technology will be modelled by means of TCAD device simulation software. The dependence of the device performance on parameters that affect the detection of minimum ionising particles (MIP) will be studied aiming at the optimisation ofthe detector performance. More specifically, the simulations will focus on the influence of the epitaxial layer thickness on the amount of collected charge, that defines the signal and the cluster size, that affects the spatial resolution.