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Modelling and characterization of ultrasonic consolidation process on aluminium alloys

Amir, Muhammad and Ghassemieh, Elaheh (2008) Modelling and characterization of ultrasonic consolidation process on aluminium alloys. In: MRS Spring Meeting 2008, 2008-04-01.

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Ultrasonic consolidation process is a rapid manufacturing process used to join thin layers of metal at low temperatures and low energy consumption. In this work, finite element method has been used to simulate the ultrasonic consolidation of Aluminium alloys 6061 (AA-6061) and 3003 (AA-3003). A thermomechanical material model has been developed in the framework of continuum cyclic plasticity theory which takes into account both volume (acoustic softening) and surface (thermal softening due to friction) effects. A friction model based on experimental studies has been developed, which takes into account the dependence of coefficient of friction upon contact pressure, amount of slip, temperature and number of cycles. Using the developed material and friction model ultrasonic consolidation process has been simulated for various combinations of process parameters involved. Experimental observations are explained on the basis of the results obtained in the present study. The current research provides the opportunity to explain the differences of the behaviour of AA-6061 and AA-3003 during the ultrasonic consolidation process. Finally, trends of the experimentally measured fracture energies of the bonded specimen are compared to the predicted friction work at the weld interface resulted from the simulation at similar process condition. Similarity of the trends indicates the validity of the developed model in its predictive capability of the process.