Picture of a black hole

Strathclyde Open Access research that creates ripples...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including by Strathclyde physicists involved in observing gravitational waves and black hole mergers as part of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) - but also other internationally significant research from the Department of Physics. Discover why Strathclyde's physics research is making ripples...

Strathprints also exposes world leading research from the Faculties of Science, Engineering, Humanities & Social Sciences, and from the Strathclyde Business School.

Discover more...

‘Circle Time’ : a systems approach to emotional and behavioural difficulties

Kelly, Barbara (1999) ‘Circle Time’ : a systems approach to emotional and behavioural difficulties. Educational Psychology in Practice, 15 (1). pp. 40-44. ISSN 0266-7363

Full text not available in this repository. (Request a copy from the Strathclyde author)

Abstract

Improved behavioural adjustment is often linked to interventions addressing self concept. The following paper describes a collaborative project carried out in a primary school where a significant number of pupils presented high levels of emotional and behavioural difficulties. Many of the presenting difficulties seemed to relate to low self‐concept. The aim of the project was to develop a systems approach offering an alternative to individual casework. The new method had to be workable within the limits of the school's immediate resources. Circle time was chosen as an experimental intervention, since it appeared to incorporate many factors and processes identified as having positive correlations with improvement in self‐concept and behaviour. Circle time was used in a whole‐class and extracted‐group context. Positive behavioural change was noted in the majority of targeted children but the whole‐class approach was seen to be the most effective.