Picture of athlete cycling

Open Access research with a real impact on health...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Physical Activity for Health Group based within the School of Psychological Sciences & Health. Research here seeks to better understand how and why physical activity improves health, gain a better understanding of the amount, intensity, and type of physical activity needed for health benefits, and evaluate the effect of interventions to promote physical activity.

Explore open research content by Physical Activity for Health...

Oxygen transport and cell viability in an annular flow bioreactor: comparison of laminar Couette and Taylor-vortex flow regimes

Curran, S.J. and Black, R.A. (2005) Oxygen transport and cell viability in an annular flow bioreactor: comparison of laminar Couette and Taylor-vortex flow regimes. Biotechnology and Bioengineering, 89 (7). pp. 766-773. ISSN 0006-3592

Full text not available in this repository. Request a copy from the Strathclyde author

Abstract

Rotating wall vessel bioreactors have been proposed as a means of controlling the fluid dynamic environment during long-term culture of mammalian cells and engineered tissues. In this study, we show how the delivery of oxygen to cells in an annular flow bioreactor is enhanced by the forced convective transport afforded by Taylor vortex flows. A fiberoptic oxygen probe with negligible lag time was used to measure the dissolved oxygen concentration in real time and under carefully controlled aeration conditions. From these data, the overall mass transfer coefficients were calculated and mass transport correlations determined under laminar Couette flow conditions and discrete Taylor vortex flow regimes, including laminar, wavy, and turbulent flows. While oxygen transport in Taylor vortex flows was significantly greater, and the available oxygen exceeded that consumed by murine fibroblasts in free suspension, the proportion of cells that remained viable decreased with increasing Reynolds number (101.8 < Rei < 1018), which we attribute to the action of fluid shear stresses on the cells as opposed to any limitation in mass transport. Nevertheless, the results of this study suggest that laminar Taylor-vortex flow regimes provide an effective means of maintaining the levels of oxygen transport required for long-term cell culture.