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Adaptive distributed source coding for wireless sensor networks

Tang, Z. and Glover, I.A. and Evans, A. and Monro, D. and He, J. (2006) Adaptive distributed source coding for wireless sensor networks. In: Wireless Conference 2006, 2006-04-02 - 2006-04-05.

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Abstract

It has been proven in theory that distributed source coding (DSC) can be used to compress correlated signals with or without loss. Recently this coding method has been used for the application of remote signal estimation in wireless sensor networks (WSN), where multiple sensor nodes compress their correlated observations without inter-node communications. Energy and bandwidth are therefore efficiently saved. No practical DSC scheme for WSNs, however, has been reported in the literature. In this paper, we study the problem of remote source estimation in WSN using a random-binning based DSC scheme. We analyze the impact of observation noise, quantization distortion, DSC decoding errors and network packet losses on the quality of the estimated signal. An adaptive control scheme is proposed to adapt the coding and transmission parameters to the network conditions. Simulation results show the proposed scheme both saves bandwidth and improves the quality of the source estimation.