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Assessing the in vitro biocompatibility of a novel carbon device for the treatment of sepsis

Sandeman, S.R. and Howell, C.A. and Phillips, G.J. and Lloyd, A.W. and Davies, J.A. and Mikhalovsky, S.V. and Tennison, S.R. and Rawlinson, A.P. and Kozynchenko, O.P. and Owen, H.L.H. and Gaylor, J.D.S. and Rouse, J.J. and Courtney, J.M. (2005) Assessing the in vitro biocompatibility of a novel carbon device for the treatment of sepsis. Biomaterials, 26 (34). pp. 7124-7131. ISSN 0142-9612

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The aim of the present study was to conduct a preliminary investigation into the blood biocompatibility of a novel, uncoated carbon for use in a filtration/adsorption device for the treatment of sepsis. Carbon well prototypes were manufactured from phenol-formaldehyde-aniline-based pyrolysed carbons using monolithic polymer technology. Inflammatory blood cell and plasma protein mediation of the inflammatory response were evaluated using the novel carbon prototypes and compared with dialyser membrane and tissue culture plate controls. Assays determining monocyte and granulocyte adhesion, platelet adhesion and activation, granulocyte activation and complement activation were performed. Preliminary findings suggest an adsorptive but passivating carbon surface. Moderate levels of monocyte and granulocytes adhesion were seen in conjunction with adsorption of plasma proteins to the carbon surface. Activation of granulocyte and adherent platelets was not detected and the complement cascade was not activated by the carbons, indicating a surface compatible with blood contact. The results support the further development of the proposed carbon-based device for the treatment of sepsis.