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The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde research outputs.

Strathprints serves world leading Open Access research by the University of Strathclyde, including research by the Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences (SIPBS), where research centres such as the Industrial Biotechnology Innovation Centre (IBioIC), the Cancer Research UK Formulation Unit, SeaBioTech and the Centre for Biophotonics are based.

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Modeling of mercury transport and fate

Duncan, Derek John and Keenan, Helen (2011) Modeling of mercury transport and fate. In: 10th International Conference on Mercury as a Global Pollutant, 2011-07-24 - 2011-07-29. (Unpublished)

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Abstract

A wide range of predictive models have been developed to better understand the fate and transport of mercury throughout the environment. This work collates some of the most accepted forms that are openly available for research purposes. Many of these have been developed and updated through progressive adaptation. While predictive models often analyse the intrinsic chemical and physical properties of mercury species in individual environmental compartments and matrices, such as those documented for atmosphere, water, land and biota, others have been developed for multimedia application. The study of environmental mercury is highly complex and requires different approaches and technologies to further enhance understanding of processes and pathways. Models therefore play an essential role in comprehending mercury behaviour and cycling, uptake, bioaccumulation and biomagnification. Effective modelling enhances human and ecosystem risk assessments by anticipating transformations and exposures to the various forms of mercury that can influence such parameters as bioavailability and toxicity. However, since there are always margins of uncertainty inherently associated with estimated data, model outputs should be interpreted as representative rather than empirical. A compilation of models will be presented.