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FRET measurements on fuzzy fluorescent nanostructures

Caorsi, V. and Ronzitti, E. and Vicidomini, G. and Krol, S. and McConnell, G. and Diaspro, A. (2007) FRET measurements on fuzzy fluorescent nanostructures. Microscopy Research and Technique, 70 (5). pp. 452-458. ISSN 1059-910X

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Abstract

In the last decade, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) has become a useful technique for studying intermolecular interactions applied to the analysis of biological systems. Although FRET measurements may be very helpful in the comprehension of different cellular processes, it can be difficult to obtain quantitative results, hence the necessity of studying FRET on controllable systems. Here, a fuzzy nanostructured system called a nanocapsule is presented as a nanometric-device allowing distance modulation, thus preserving photophysical properties of fluorescent dyes and exhibiting good potential features for improving quantitative FRET analysis. We evaluated the behavior of such a sample using four FRET methods (three of them based on steady-state fluorescence and one using lifetime measurements). Within some limitations that can be overcome, these nanodevices have the potential to serve as a benchmark system for characterizing new FRET couples and to develop quantitative approaches for FRET analysis.