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An evaluation of the sanctuary community conversation programme to address mental health stigma with asylum seekers and refugees in Glasgow

Quinn, Neil and Shirjeel, S and Siebelt, L and Donnelly, R and Pietka, E. (2011) An evaluation of the sanctuary community conversation programme to address mental health stigma with asylum seekers and refugees in Glasgow. [Report]

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Abstract

With Scotland hosting increasing numbers of asylum seekers and refugees, the mental health needs of this population has become an important issue to address. The Sanctuary Programme was initially developed in 2007, bringing together national, regional and local partners to undertake an action research project in 2008, seeking to identify patterns of stigma and discrimination experienced by asylum seekers and refugees in Glasgow and to explore how this may be addressed through community development approaches. The research led to the development of the community conversations project; mental health awareness workshops facilitated by people with experience of seeking asylum. The programme was delivered between 2009 and 2010 and aimed to effectively engage with asylum seeker and refugee communities to increase understanding of mental health, reduce stigma, increase help seeking and promote recovery.