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Methodology for testing loss of mains detection algorithms for microgrids and distributed generation using real-time power hardware–in-the-loop based technique

Crolla, Paul and Dysko, Adam and Roscoe, Andrew and Burt, Graeme (2011) Methodology for testing loss of mains detection algorithms for microgrids and distributed generation using real-time power hardware–in-the-loop based technique. In: IEEE Globecom 2011 Worksh on Rural Communications - Technologies, Applications, Strategies and Policies, 2011-12-05 - 2011-12-09.

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Abstract

The effective integration of distributed energy resources in distribution networks demands powerful simulation and test methods in order to determine both system and component behaviour, and understand their interaction. Unexpected disconnection of a significant volume of distributed generation (DG) could have potentially serious consequences for the entire system [1], this means DG sources can no longer be treated as purely negative load. This paper proposes a method of testing loss-of-mains (LOM) detection and protection schemes for distributed energy resources (DER) using real-time power hardware-in-the-loop (RT PHIL). The approach involves connecting the generator and interface under test (e.g. motor-generator set or inverter, controlled by an RTS – Real Time Station[3]) to a real-time simulator (an RTDS – Real Time Digital Simulator[2]) which simulates the local loads and upstream power system. This arrangement allows observation of the interaction with other controls in the network beyond the local microgrid area. These LOM schemes are of increasing importance because with growing penetration levels of distributed generation the network operator has less visibility and control of the connected generation. Furthermore when the generation and load in a particular network area are closely matched (e.g. a grid-connected microgrid), it becomes increasingly difficult to detect a loss of grid supply at the generator. This work builds upon the existing LOM testing methodology proposed in [4]. By utilising RT PHIL and a laboratory microgrid, the testing environment has been brought to a new level of functionality where system integrity can be more rigorously and realistically evaluated.