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The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Physical Activity for Health Group based within the School of Psychological Sciences & Health. Research here seeks to better understand how and why physical activity improves health, gain a better understanding of the amount, intensity, and type of physical activity needed for health benefits, and evaluate the effect of interventions to promote physical activity.

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Low physical activity levels and high levels of sedentary behaviour are characteristic of rural Irish primary school children

Reilly, John J and Kelly, L.A. and Paton, J.Y. and Grant, S. (2005) Low physical activity levels and high levels of sedentary behaviour are characteristic of rural Irish primary school children. Irish Medical Journal, 98 (5). pp. 139-141. ISSN 0332-3102

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Abstract

There is increasing public health concern that levels of physical activity in children are extremely low. This study aimed to describe objectively levels of physical activity and sedentary behaviour during the waking hours in a sample of 4-5 year old (median 5.4 years range 4.3, 6.0) rural Irish children (n=41) and to test for gender differences in patterns of physical activity and sedentary behaviour. There were significant gender differences in physical activity (Boys (median) 834 accelerometer counts per minute (cpm), girls (median) 628cpm; p = 0.0015), sedentary behaviour (Boys 74% of waking time, girls 81% of waking time, p=0.0011) and moderate-vigorous physical activity (Boys 4% of waking time, girls 2% of waking time; p=0.0175). This study that suggests young rural Irish children lead sedentary lifestyles.