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The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Physical Activity for Health Group based within the School of Psychological Sciences & Health. Research here seeks to better understand how and why physical activity improves health, gain a better understanding of the amount, intensity, and type of physical activity needed for health benefits, and evaluate the effect of interventions to promote physical activity.

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Measurement of nitrous oxide emission from agricultural land using micrometeorological methods

Hargreaves, K J and Wienhold, F G and Klemedtsson, L and Arah, J R M and Beverland, I J and Fowler, D and Galle, B and Griffith, D W T and Skiba, U and Smith, K A and Welling, M and Harris, G W (1996) Measurement of nitrous oxide emission from agricultural land using micrometeorological methods. Atmospheric Environment, 30 (10-11). pp. 1563-1571. ISSN 1352-2310

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Abstract

The spatial variability of N2O emission from soil makes extrapolation to the field scale very difficult using conventional chamber techniques (<1 m(2)). Micrometeorological techniques, which integrate N2O fluxes over areas of 0.1 to 1 km(2) were therefore developed and compared with chamber methods over arable cropland. Measurements of N2O emission from an unfertilised organic soil (reclaimed from the sea in 1879) were made over a 10 d period at Lammefjord, Denmark. Flux-gradient and conditional sampling techniques were applied using two tunable diode laser spectrometers (TDLs), a Fourier transform infra-red spectrometer (FTIR) and a gas chromatograph (GC). Eddy covariance measurements were also made by the TDLs. Over the 10 d campaign approximately 5 d of continuous fluxes by the different methods were obtained. Fluxes determined by eddy covariance were in reasonable agreement, showing a mean flux of 269 mu g N m(2) h(-1). Flux-gradient techniques measured a mean flux of 226 mu g N m(-2) h(-1). The mean flux measured by conditional sampling was 379 mu g N m(-2) h(-1). The maximum annual emission of N2O from this soil system was estimated to be 23.5 kg N ha(-1).