Picture of a black hole

Strathclyde Open Access research that creates ripples...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including by Strathclyde physicists involved in observing gravitational waves and black hole mergers as part of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) - but also other internationally significant research from the Department of Physics. Discover why Strathclyde's physics research is making ripples...

Strathprints also exposes world leading research from the Faculties of Science, Engineering, Humanities & Social Sciences, and from the Strathclyde Business School.

Discover more...

Design, construction and operation of flux measurement systems using the conditional sampling technique

Beverland, I J and Oneill, D H and Scott, S L and Moncrieff, J B (1996) Design, construction and operation of flux measurement systems using the conditional sampling technique. Atmospheric Environment, 30 (18). pp. 3209-3220. ISSN 1352-2310

Full text not available in this repository. (Request a copy from the Strathclyde author)

Abstract

The design, construction and field operation of computer-based systems for the measurement of trace gas fluxes using the conditional sampling technique are described. A simple system which sampled air into sampling bags was used to measure CH4 and N2O fluxes from peatland and agricultural land, respectively. The system was subsequently automated by making real-time measurements of the gas mixing ratios in the sampling lines thus providing continuous measurements for periods of up to several days. Minor modifications enabled measurement of total hydrocarbons, CO2 and non-methane hydrocarbon fluxes from a forest ecosystem. Intercomparison of conditional sampling with other techniques (eddy covariance, gradient and aircraft boundary layer budget) was encouraging with good agreement between flux measurements of CH4, CO2, N2O and sensible heat. The system has been developed in a sufficiently simple and robust manner to enable extended field measurements. A number of theoretical problems remain including the absolute accuracy of the gas analysis procedures and real-time coordinate rotation procedures to deal with non-uniform terrain.