Picture of a black hole

Strathclyde Open Access research that creates ripples...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including by Strathclyde physicists involved in observing gravitational waves and black hole mergers as part of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) - but also other internationally significant research from the Department of Physics. Discover why Strathclyde's physics research is making ripples...

Strathprints also exposes world leading research from the Faculties of Science, Engineering, Humanities & Social Sciences, and from the Strathclyde Business School.

Discover more...

Measurement of field scale N2O emission fluxes from a wheat crop using micrometeorological techniques

Skiba, U and Hargreaves, K J and Beverland, I J and ONeill, D H and Fowler, D and Moncrieff, J B (1996) Measurement of field scale N2O emission fluxes from a wheat crop using micrometeorological techniques. Plant and Soil, 181 (1). pp. 139-144. ISSN 0032-079X

Full text not available in this repository. (Request a copy from the Strathclyde author)

Abstract

Measurements of N2O emission fluxes from a 3 ha field of winter wheat were measured using eddy covariance and relaxed eddy accumulation continuously over 10 days during April 1994. The measurements averaged fluxes over approximately 10(5) m(2) of the field, which was fertilised with NH4NO3 at a rate of 43 kg N ha(-1) at the beginning of the measurements. The emission fluxes became detectable after the first heavy rainfall, which occured 4 days after fertiliser application. Emissions of N2O increased rapidly during the day following thr: rain to a maximum of 280 ng N m(-2)s(-1) and declined over the following week. During the period of significant emission fluxes, a clear diurnal cycle in N2O emission was observed, with the daytime maximum coinciding with the soil temperature maximum at 12 cm depth. The temperature dependence of the N2O emission was equivalent to an activation energy for N2O production of 108 kJ mol(-1). The N2O fluxes measured using relaxed eddy accumulation, averaged over 30 to 270 min, were in agreement with those of the eddy covariance system within 60%. The total emission of N2O over the period of continuous measurement(10 days) was equivalent to about 10 kg N2O-N, or 0.77% of the N fertiliser applied.