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The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde research outputs.

Strathprints serves world leading Open Access research by the University of Strathclyde, including research by the Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences (SIPBS), where research centres such as the Industrial Biotechnology Innovation Centre (IBioIC), the Cancer Research UK Formulation Unit, SeaBioTech and the Centre for Biophotonics are based.

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Parental feeding style, energy intake and weight status in young children

Reilly, John J and Montgomery, C. and Jackson, D.M. and Kelly, L.A. (2006) Parental feeding style, energy intake and weight status in young children. British Journal of Nutrition, 96 (6). pp. 1149-1153. ISSN 0007-1145

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Abstract

Parental feeding style, as measured by the Child Feeding Questionnaire (CFQ), may be an important influence on child feeding behaviour and weight status in early to mid childhood, but more evidence on parental feeding style is required from samples outside the USA. We aimed to use the CFQ in a sample of 117 Scottish children (boys n 53, girls n 64 mean age 4·6 (sd 0·5) years) to: characterise gender differences and changes over time (in forty of the 117 children studied over 2 years); test associations between parental feeding style, free-living energy intake (measured over 3 days using the multiple pass 24-h recall), and weight status (BMI sd score). No dimensions of parental feeding style changed significantly over 2 years in the longitudinal study (P>0·05 in all cases). No aspects of parental feeding style as measured by the CFQ differed significantly between the sexes (P>0·05 in all cases). Parental perceptions of child weight status were generally significantly positively correlated with child weight status as measured by the BMI sd score. In this sample and setting, measures of parental control over child feeding were generally not associated with child energy intake or weight status.