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An application of the extended model of goal directed behaviour within smoking cessation : an examination of the role of emotions

Thomson, J.A. and Shaw, D. and Shiu, Edward (2007) An application of the extended model of goal directed behaviour within smoking cessation : an examination of the role of emotions. In: European advances in consumer research. European Advances in Consumer Research . Association for Consumer Research, Duluth, MN, pp. 73-79.

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Abstract

The Extended Model of Goal directed Behaviour (EMGB) is the latest decision making model which considers the role of a behavioural act in pursuit of a further goal. Perugini and Bagozzi (2001) attempted to deepen and broaden the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) by addressing the areas of affect, motivation and habit. A limited number of empirical studies utilising the EMGB and its predecessor Model of Goal directed Behaviour (MGB) have been applied to a variety of behaviours including: body weight regulation, studying effort, the regulation of hypertension, learning SPSS software and eating in a fast food restaurant (Bagozzi and Lee, 2000; Leone, et al., 1999; Perugini and Bagozzi, 2001; Taylor et al., 2005). Overall the findings of these studies have concluded favourably on the MGB and the EMGB, and have shown that these models deliver superior performance when compared to the TPB in terms of predictive utility (Perugini and Conner, 2000). However, concerning the capture of affect through the antecedents of anticipated emotion it is interesting to note the lack of consistency in the empirical findings in this area. Examining the Bagozzi and Lee (2000) study on body weight regulation positive emotion alone was found to be significant; furthermore, in a test of studying effort (Leone, et al. 1999) negative anticipated emotion alone was significant. The current research recognises this inconsistency in the capture of emotion and a two phase study was launched to examine, in detail the role of emotions within the EMGB.