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A novel DSM philosophy for building integrated renewable systems

Counsell, John and Stewart, Matt John and Logan, Rufus and Doran, Sean and Ward, Wayne (2011) A novel DSM philosophy for building integrated renewable systems. In: 2nd International Conference in Microgeneration and Related Technologies, Glasgow April 4-6 2011, 2011-03-31.

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Abstract

This paper presents an overview of a novel concept in IT network design and power control focused on matching building integrated renewable power generation with local demands. It describes how this is achieved through combination of energy demand reduction and dynamic utilisation of embedded energy storage in a robust, efficient and cost effective manner. A brief overview of the main features of the design is given in terms of its intended benefits as an integrated system. The load components and distribution topology are described for this experimental system within the limits set by the capacity, capabilities and desired function of the network. Power supply to the network is described as including a back-up source to the photovoltaic (PV) source to add functionality and stability with no requirements for undesirable exporting of excess PV generation. The necessary configuration of the renewable array integrating with the network is also highlighted with an example compatible solar module device. A trial of the technology and demand management control in a high profile office building is described. This trial in a live working environment is providing invaluable real world data to compare against modelling and network simulation results.