Picture of a black hole

Strathclyde Open Access research that creates ripples...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including by Strathclyde physicists involved in observing gravitational waves and black hole mergers as part of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) - but also other internationally significant research from the Department of Physics. Discover why Strathclyde's physics research is making ripples...

Strathprints also exposes world leading research from the Faculties of Science, Engineering, Humanities & Social Sciences, and from the Strathclyde Business School.

Discover more...

Separation of ethane gas by adsorption onto various biomass-derived activated carbons

Guo, Jia and Hu, Guang and Lua, Aik Chong and Heslop, Mark (2010) Separation of ethane gas by adsorption onto various biomass-derived activated carbons. Advanced Materials Research, 113-116. pp. 1896-1899. ISSN 1022-6680

Full text not available in this repository. (Request a copy from the Strathclyde author)

Abstract

Adsorption of ethane onto activated carbons derived from oil palm shell, bamboo and coconut shell, three abundantly-available agricultural solid wastes, by thermal or chemical activation method was investigated in this paper. Dynamic adsorption in a fixed bed configuration showed that the activated carbons prepared by chemical activation performed better than those by thermal activation. Desorption tests at the same temperature as adsorption (298K) and at an elevated temperature (473K) were carried out to confirm the occurrence of chemisorption on the activated carbons. Surface chemistries of the activated carbons were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and Boehm titration. It was found that uptaking ethane onto the biomass-based activated carbons was due to different mechanisms, e.g. physisorption, and/or chemisorption, depending on the activation agent and activation method.