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The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Department of Computer & Information Sciences involved in mathematically structured programming, similarity and metric search, computer security, software systems, combinatronics and digital health.

The Department also includes the iSchool Research Group, which performs leading research into socio-technical phenomena and topics such as information retrieval and information seeking behaviour.

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Catalytic combustion of pulverized coal injected into a blast furnace and its industrial test

Guo, Jia and Hu, Jing and Heslop, Mark and Lua, Aik Chong (2010) Catalytic combustion of pulverized coal injected into a blast furnace and its industrial test. Advanced Materials Research, 113-116. pp. 1766-1769. ISSN 1022-6680

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Abstract

Pulverized coals are widely used by injection into the blast furnaces in order to replace expensive cokes. In this paper, a new catalytic combustion promoter, containing manganese dioxide with other oxides (or carbonates) of rare earth metals and alkali earth metals, was developed to enhance the combustion of pulverized coal. The effects of addition amount on the ignition temperature and the combustion efficiency were investigated. With more promoters added, the ignition temperature dropped, whilst the combustion efficiency increased significantly. Industrial test showed that, with the addition of 0.4% of the promoter, the coke consumption reduced to 26.7 kg/tFe (equivalent to 7.5 million US dollars per blast furnace per year), and the carbon contents in the fly ash dropped to from 43.1% to 32.4%, which suggests great economic and environmental benefits.