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The effect of molybdenum and boron in soil on the growth and photosynthesis of three soybean varieties

Liu, P. and Yang, Y. S. and Xu, G. D. and Fang, Y. H. and Yang, Y. A. and Kalin, R. M. (2005) The effect of molybdenum and boron in soil on the growth and photosynthesis of three soybean varieties. Plant, Soil and Environment, 51 (5). pp. 197-205. ISSN 1214-1178

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Abstract

This paper presents a study on growth and photosynthesis response of soybean to Mo and/or B in soil. Pot experiments were set up to examine the effect of Mo and/or B on growth and photosynthesis of three soybean varieties with four treatments (control, +Mo, +B, +[Mo + B]) at various growth stages. The study showed that Mo and/or B increased main length, system volume and dry weight of the roots, aboveground biomass, leaves' photosynthesis rate of soybean. The variation and interaction between Mo and B in soil was explored with regard to their impact on soybean growth and photosynthesis. There were some dissimilarity in growth and photosynthesis in the plants between the supplements of Mo and B in the soil, and the interrelation between Mo and B in plant and was co-supplementary to each other. Therefore, growth and photosynthesis of the soybean with Mo and B treatments were much more improved than those with Mo or B alone. Besides, some genotypic variation was found in three soybean varieties, in which Zhechun III was the most sensitive and 3811 the most tolerant plant to Mo and B.