Picture of two heads

Open Access research that challenges the mind...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including those from the School of Psychological Sciences & Health - but also papers by researchers based within the Faculties of Science, Engineering, Humanities & Social Sciences, and from the Strathclyde Business School.

Discover more...

Insect repellent [correction of repellant] interactions : sunscreens enhance DEET (N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide) absorption

Ross, Edward A and Savage, Kathleen A and Utley, Luke J and Tebbett, Ian R (2004) Insect repellent [correction of repellant] interactions : sunscreens enhance DEET (N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide) absorption. Drug Metabolism and Disposition, 32 (8). pp. 783-785. ISSN 0090-9556

Full text not available in this repository. (Request a copy from the Strathclyde author)

Abstract

Toxicology studies are typically performed on single compounds, which we hypothesized would miss adverse synergies from chemical mixtures. This hypothesis was tested using an insect repellant and sunscreens because both groups include known permeation enhancers, with prior pediatric reports of toxicity from highly concentrated DEET (N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide). Using real-time mass spectroscopy in a hairless mouse skin model, we confirmed substantial penetration of a 20% DEET standard. Despite a lower (10%) DEET content, a commercially marketed sunscreen formulation had a 6-fold more rapid detection (5 versus 30 min) and 3.4-fold greater penetration at steady state. We also tested the efficacy of DEET microemulsion products and confirmed that one successfully slowed the onset of absorption, but not the steady-state permeation. Risks from mixtures of potential toxins are worthy of routine testing, which can be accomplished by simple assays, and are of utmost importance for pediatric applications.