Picture of person typing on laptop with programming code visible on the laptop screen

World class computing and information science research at Strathclyde...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Department of Computer & Information Sciences involved in mathematically structured programming, similarity and metric search, computer security, software systems, combinatronics and digital health.

The Department also includes the iSchool Research Group, which performs leading research into socio-technical phenomena and topics such as information retrieval and information seeking behaviour.

Explore

Direct measurement of rheologically induced molecular orientation in gas separation hollow fibre membranes and effects on selectivity

Ismail, A.F. and Shilton, S.J. and Dunkin, I.R. and Gallivan, S.L. (1997) Direct measurement of rheologically induced molecular orientation in gas separation hollow fibre membranes and effects on selectivity. Journal of Membrane Science, 126 (1). pp. 133-137. ISSN 0376-7388

Full text not available in this repository. Request a copy from the Strathclyde author

Abstract

Asymmetric polysulfone hollow fibre membranes for gas separation were spun using a dry/wet spinning process. An optimised four component dope solution was used: 22% (w/w) polysulfone, 31.8% (w/w) N,N-dimethylacetamide, 31.8% (w/ w) tetrahydrofuran and 14.4% (w/w) ethanol. Fibres were spun at low- and high-dope extrusion rates and hence at different levels of shear. Molecular orientation in the active layer of the membranes was measured by plane-polarised infrared spectroscopy. Gas permeation properties (permeability and selectivity) were evaluated using pure carbon dioxide and methane. The spectroscopy indicated that increased molecular orientation occurs in the high-shear membranes. The selectivities of these membranes were heightened and even surpassed the recognised intrinsic selectivity of the membrane polymer. The results suggest that increased shear during spinning increases molecular orientation and, in turn, enhances selectivity.