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Micropatterned substratum adhesiveness : a model for morphogenetic cues controlling cell behavior

Britland, S and Clark, P and Connolly, P and Moores, G (1992) Micropatterned substratum adhesiveness : a model for morphogenetic cues controlling cell behavior. Experimental Cell Research, 198 (1). pp. 124-129. ISSN 0014-4827

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Abstract

It is generally considered that tracks of cell adhesiveness are important in controlling cell migration during the development and regeneration of many tissues. In order to investigate this experimentally, a number of techniques have in the past been employed to make patterns of differential adhesiveness for in vitro studies. However, practical limitations on patterning resolution and the introduction of residual topography to the experimental substrata have restricted their usefulness. Here we describe a simplified photolithographic technique for patterning cell adhesiveness which allows a high degree of flexibility and precision. We have quantified, using adhesion and spreading characteristics of BHK cells, the differential adhesiveness that can be created on patterned surfaces, how this alters with the duration of exposure to serum proteins, and how this, in turn, relates to the persistence of cell patterning despite increases in cell density. We believe that this technique will prove extremely useful for the detailed in vitro examination of the mechanisms controlling cell behavior as it offers a degree of precision and ease of fabrication that has previously been unavailable.