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Pharmacokinetics and tissue penetration of vancomycin continuous infusion as prophylaxis for vascular surgery

Payne, Christopher J and Thomson, Alison H and Stearns, Adam T and Watson, David G and Zhang, Tong and Kingsmore, David B and Byrne, Dominique S and Binning, Alexander S (2011) Pharmacokinetics and tissue penetration of vancomycin continuous infusion as prophylaxis for vascular surgery. Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, 66 (11). pp. 2624-2627.

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Abstract

To determine the tissue penetration of vancomycin into perivascular fat and arterial wall during a continuous infusion of vancomycin, given as prophylaxis for vascular surgery. Patients undergoing arterial reconstruction requiring antibiotic prophylaxis were included. Patients received a loading infusion of vancomycin the evening prior to surgery followed by a continuous 24 h infusion, calculated according to renal function. Three peri-operative serum samples and intra-operative perivascular fat and arterial wall samples were collected for vancomycin assay. Twenty-eight patients were included. Three serum samples were obtained from all patients, fat samples were available from 27 (96.4%) patients and vessel wall samples were available from 23 (82.1%) patients. Serum vancomycin concentrations were maintained within a relatively narrow range, while fat and arterial wall concentrations were highly variable. This study has shown that prophylactic administration of vancomycin with a loading infusion followed by a continuous infusion before and during vascular surgery achieves serum and vascular tissue concentrations that are above the MICs for most common organisms implicated in post-operative graft infection. However, penetration into perivascular fat tissues is poor.