Picture of smart phone in human hand

World leading smartphone and mobile technology research at Strathclyde...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including by Strathclyde researchers from the Department of Computer & Information Sciences involved in researching exciting new applications for mobile and smartphone technology. But the transformative application of mobile technologies is also the focus of research within disciplines as diverse as Electronic & Electrical Engineering, Marketing, Human Resource Management and Biomedical Enginering, among others.

Explore Strathclyde's Open Access research on smartphone technology now...

A preliminary evaluation of text-based and dependency-based techniques for determining the origins of bugs

Davies, Steven and Roper, Marc and Wood, Murray (2011) A preliminary evaluation of text-based and dependency-based techniques for determining the origins of bugs. In: 18th Working Conference on Reverse Engineering (WCRE 2011). IEEE, pp. 201-210. ISBN 978-1-4577-1948-6

[img]
Preview
PDF
wcre11_paper.pdf - Accepted Author Manuscript

Download (362kB) | Preview

Abstract

A crucial step in understanding the life cycle of software bugs is identifying their origin. Unfortunately this information is not usually recorded and recovering it at a later date is challenging. Recently two approaches have been developed that attempt to solve this problem: the text approach and the dependency approach. However only limited evaluation has been carried out on their effectiveness so far, partially due to the lack of data sets linking bugs to their introduction. Producing such data sets is both time-consuming and challenging due to the subjective nature of the problem. To improve this, the origins of 166 bugs in two open-source projects were manually identified. These were then compared to a simulation of the approaches. The results show that both approaches were partially successful across a variety of different types of bugs. They achieved a precision of 29%{79% and a recall of 40%{70%, and could perform better when combined. However there remain a number of challenges to overcome in future development|large commits, unrelated changes and large numbers of versions between the origin and the x all reduce their effectiveness.