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Performance of Luciano Berio's Sequenza for Solo Guitar. Ramshorn Theatre 98 Ingram Street Glasgow G1 1ES 7th Jun 2011 in Glasgow : Tuesday 7 June - Guitar Fusion Peter Argondizza performs Berio's Sequenza XI and a selection of jazz standards on the classical guitar, together with the Scottish premieres of Fusion Tune, Cairn, and San Francisco Shuffle - three electric guitar works by American composer Steve Mackay.

Argondizza, Peter (2011) Performance of Luciano Berio's Sequenza for Solo Guitar. Ramshorn Theatre 98 Ingram Street Glasgow G1 1ES 7th Jun 2011 in Glasgow : Tuesday 7 June - Guitar Fusion Peter Argondizza performs Berio's Sequenza XI and a selection of jazz standards on the classical guitar, together with the Scottish premieres of Fusion Tune, Cairn, and San Francisco Shuffle - three electric guitar works by American composer Steve Mackay. [Performance]

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Abstract

Scottish Premiere of Luciano Berio's Sequenza for Guitar performed by Peter Argondizza. "Berio's Sequenza XI for Guitar is considered the most difficult and virtuosic avant-garde work for the instrument. Berio combines several pitch classes to pit the idiomatic harmony of the guitar-perfect fourths-in conflict with the tension of the tritone in a structure that resembles Bach’s Ciaconna from the second violin partita in d minor. The performance presents a variety of guitar techniques including rasqueado (from flamenco), tremolo, glissando, harmonics and tambour (percussive effects). The dramatic work reaches a calm resolution through the final reiteration of the tritone."