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Strathprints serves world leading Open Access research by the University of Strathclyde, including research by the Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences (SIPBS), where research centres such as the Industrial Biotechnology Innovation Centre (IBioIC), the Cancer Research UK Formulation Unit, SeaBioTech and the Centre for Biophotonics are based.

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Predicting university undergraduates' binge-drinking behavior : a comparative test of the one- and two-component theories of planned behavior

Elliott, Mark and Ainsworth, Kirsty (2012) Predicting university undergraduates' binge-drinking behavior : a comparative test of the one- and two-component theories of planned behavior. Addictive Behaviors, 37 (1). pp. 92-101.

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Abstract

This study provides a comparative test of the one- and two-component theories of planned behavior (TPB) in the context of university undergraduates’ binge-drinking. Participants (N=120) self-completed questionnaire measures of all TPB constructs at time 1 and subsequent binge-drinking at time 2 (two-weeks later). The data were analyzed using a combination of path analyses and bootstrapping procedures. Both models accounted for a substantial proportion of the variation in behavior. However, the two-component TPB provided a significantly better fit to the data, with the total direct and indirect effects accounting for 90% of the variance. Intention was the only direct predictor of behavior. Instrumental attitude, affective attitude and self-efficacy had indirect effects. Although health interventions could usefully target these cognitive antecedents, simulation analyses, modelling the effects of cognition change on behavior, showed that only large- (0.8 SD) sized changes to affective attitude, or moderate-sized changes to all of these cognitions in combination were sufficient to reduce binge-drinking.