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Shinren : Non-monotonic trust management for distributed systems

Dong, Changyu and Dulay, Naranker (2010) Shinren : Non-monotonic trust management for distributed systems. In: Trust Management IV. Springer, pp. 125-140. ISBN 978-3-642-13445-6

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Abstract

The open and dynamic nature of modern distributed systems and pervasive environments presents significant challenges to security management. One solution may be trust management which utilises the notion of trust in order to specify and interpret security policies and make decisions on security-related actions. Most trust management systems assume monotonicity where additional information can only result in the increasing of trust. The monotonic assumption oversimplifies the real world by not considering negative information, thus it cannot handle many real world scenarios. In this paper we present Shinren, a novel non-monotonic trust management system based on bilattice theory and the anyworld assumption. Shinren takes into account negative information and supports reasoning with incomplete information, uncertainty and inconsistency. Information from multiple sources such as credentials, recommendations, reputation and local knowledge can be used and combined in order to establish trust. Shinren also supports prioritisation which is important in decision making and resolving modality conflicts that are caused by non-monotonicity.