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Use of a solvent-free dry matrix coating for quantitative matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization imaging of 4-bromophenyl-1,4-diazabicyclo(3.2.2)nonane-4-carboxylate in rat brain and quantitative analysis of the drug from laser microdissected tissue regions

Goodwin, R J A and Scullion, P and Macintyre, L and Watson, D G and Pitt, A R (2010) Use of a solvent-free dry matrix coating for quantitative matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization imaging of 4-bromophenyl-1,4-diazabicyclo(3.2.2)nonane-4-carboxylate in rat brain and quantitative analysis of the drug from laser microdissected tissue regions. Analytical Chemistry, 82 (9). pp. 3868-3873.

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Abstract

A dry matrix application for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI MSI) was used to profile the distribution of 4-bromophenyl-1,4-diazabicyclo(3.2.2)nonane-4-carboxylate, monohydrochloride (BDNC, SSR180711) in rat brain tissue sections. Matrix application involved applying layers of finely ground dry alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA) to the surface of tissue sections thaw mounted onto MALDI targets. It was not possible to detect the drug when applying matrix in a standard aqueous-organic solvent solution. The drug was detected at higher concentrations in specific regions of the brain, particularly the white matter of the cerebellum. Pseudomultiple reaction monitoring imaging was used to validate that the observed distribution was the target compound. The semiquantitative data obtained from signal intensities in the imaging was confirmed by laser microdissection of specific regions of the brain directed by the imaging, followed by hydrophilic interaction chromatography in combination with a quantitative high-resolution mass spectrometry method. This study illustrates that a dry matrix coating is a valuable and complementary matrix application method for analysis of small polar drugs and metabolites that can be used for semiquantitative analysis.