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The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Department of Computer & Information Sciences involved in mathematically structured programming, similarity and metric search, computer security, software systems, combinatronics and digital health.

The Department also includes the iSchool Research Group, which performs leading research into socio-technical phenomena and topics such as information retrieval and information seeking behaviour.

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Developments in self and task perception in students engaging in a preservice music education programme

Hewitt, A. (2003) Developments in self and task perception in students engaging in a preservice music education programme. Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education, 158 (2003). pp. 55-70. ISSN 0010-9894

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Abstract

Research suggests that the belief patterns of teachers have a significant influence on their practice. Whether related to specific teaching activities or aspects of self-perception, such models underpin the nature and character of teachers' practice in the music classroom. In this study developments in teacher education students' (n=148) task and self-beliefs were monitored as they progressed through a short training programme in primary school music teaching. The participants had no formal music qualifications beyond school level. The study used two survey instruments, one of which was completed by students before and after the training programme and the other on a weekly basis. Both instruments were constructed using Perceived Control Theory and explored participants' strategic and capacity beliefs in relation to teaching music and to the specific performing, listening and composition activities taught within the weekly class. Results indicate that training programmes can have a positive influence on non-specialist education students' task and self-perception, and in so doing support the development of belief models that may encourage those students to teach music in the primary classroom.