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Factors affecting the views and attitudes of Scottish pharmacists to continuing professional development

Power, Ailsa and Grammatiki, Aikaterini and Bates, Ian and Mckellar, Susan and Johnson, Julienne and Diack, H. Lesley and Stewart, Derek and Hudson, Stephen (2011) Factors affecting the views and attitudes of Scottish pharmacists to continuing professional development. International Journal of Pharmacy Practice, 19 (6). pp. 424-430. ISSN 0961-7671

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Abstract

To explore factors associated with Scottish pharmacists' views and attitudes to continuing professional development (CPD). A retrospective principal component analysis of 552 (22.8%) questionnaires returned from a sample of 2420 Scottish pharmacists randomly selected from the 4300 pharmacists registered with the Royal Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain and with a Scottish address. Principal component analysis of questionnaire items (n = 19) revealed four factors associated with Scottish pharmacists' views and attitudes to CPD: having positive support in the workplace, having access to resources and meeting learning needs, having confidence in the CPD process and motivation to participate in the CPD process. Community pharmacists were identified as the subgroup of pharmacists that needed most support for CPD regarding all four factors, while pharmacists working in primary care felt that they had most support in the workplace in comparison to other sectors (P < 0.05) and better access to resources and meeting learning needs when compared to community (P < 0.001) and hospital (P = 0.008) colleagues. Pharmacists working in primary care also felt more motivated to participate in the CPD process than those in the community (P < 0.001), and hospital pharmacists reported having more confidence in the CPD process compared to community pharmacists (P < 0.05). Using principal component analysis has identified four factors associated with Scottish pharmacists' views and attitudes to CPD. This may provide an approach to facilitate comparison of CPD views and attitudes with intra and inter professional groupings. Further study may allow identification of good practice and solutions to common CPD issues.