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Analysis of developmental gene conservation in the Actinomycetales using DNA/DNA microarray comparisons

Kirby, Ralph and Herron, Paul and Hoskisson, Paul (2011) Analysis of developmental gene conservation in the Actinomycetales using DNA/DNA microarray comparisons. Antonie van Leeuwenhoek, 99 (2). pp. 159-177.

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Abstract

Based on available genome sequences, Actinomycetales show significant gene synteny across a wide range of species and genera. In addition, many genera show varying degrees of complex morphological development. Using the presence of gene synteny as a basis, it is clear that an analysis of gene conservation across the Streptomyces and various other Actinomycetales will provide information on both the importance of genes and gene clusters and the evolution of morphogenesis in these bacteria. Genome sequencing, although becoming cheaper, is still relatively expensive for comparing large numbers of strains. Thus, a heterologous DNA/DNA microarray hybridization dataset based on a Streptomyces coelicolor microarray allows a cheaper and greater depth of analysis of gene conservation. This study, using both bioinformatical and microarray approaches, was able to classify genes previously identified as involved in morphogenesis in Streptomyces into various subgroups in terms of conservation across species and genera. This will allow the targeting of genes for further study based on their importance at the species level and at higher evolutionary levels.