Picture of Open Access badges

Discover Open Access research at Strathprints

It's International Open Access Week, 24-30 October 2016. This year's theme is "Open in Action" and is all about taking meaningful steps towards opening up research and scholarship. The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde research outputs. Explore recent world leading Open Access research content by University of Strathclyde researchers and see how Strathclyde researchers are committing to putting "Open in Action".


Image: h_pampel, CC-BY

Reproductive component vaccine developments for contraceptive and non-contraceptive uses

Ferro, Valerie A and Garside, Deborah A (2011) Reproductive component vaccine developments for contraceptive and non-contraceptive uses. Expert Opinion on Therapeutic Patents, 21 (9). pp. 1473-1482.

Full text not available in this repository. (Request a copy from the Strathclyde author)


Introduction: There has been no novel contraceptive development since 'the Pill', 50 years ago. Despite the subsequent steady increase in the use of contraceptives, the contraceptive needs of a significant proportion of the world population have not yet been met. The key need is for novel, effective, practical, long-lasting, affordable, non-steroidal contraceptives. Immunocontraception, based on vaccination against components of the reproductive system that do not affect other physiological systems, fulfils most of the criteria of such a contraceptive. To date, immunocontraceptives have been developed for animal use and the application to human contraception is an exciting proposition. In addition, immunocontraceptive research has provided a greater understanding of the vaccination against 'self-antigens' and has led to non-contraceptive developments for these vaccines. Areas covered: This review provides an understanding of the historic context of immunocontraceptives and the progress that has been made. In some cases, the contraceptive aspect has been abandoned, but the knowledge gained has enabled other therapeutic advances. Expert opinion: Reproductive research is still an important area and innovations continue to arise, which offer hope for new therapeutics in reproduction and related fields.