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Strathprints serves world leading Open Access research by the University of Strathclyde, including research by the Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences (SIPBS), where research centres such as the Industrial Biotechnology Innovation Centre (IBioIC), the Cancer Research UK Formulation Unit, SeaBioTech and the Centre for Biophotonics are based.

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5-HT2A receptor signalling through phospholipase D1 associated with its C-terminal tail

Barclay, Zoë and Dickson, Louise and Robertson, Derek N and Johnson, Melanie S and Holland, Pamela J and Rosie, Roberta and Sun, Liting and Fleetwood-Walker, Sue and Lutz, Eve M and Mitchell, Rory (2011) 5-HT2A receptor signalling through phospholipase D1 associated with its C-terminal tail. Biochemical Journal, 436 (3). pp. 651-60.

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Abstract

The 5-HT2AR (5-hydroxytryptamine-2A receptor) is a GPCR (G-protein-coupled receptor) that is implicated in the actions of hallucinogens and represents a major target of atypical antipsychotic agents. In addition to its classical signalling though PLC (phospholipase C), the receptor can activate several other pathways, including ARF (ADP-ribosylation factor)-dependent activation of PLD (phospholipase D), which appears to be achieved through a mechanism independent of heterotrimeric G-proteins. In the present study we show that wild-type and inactive constructs of PLD1 (but not PLD2) respectively facilitate and inhibit ARF-dependent PLD signalling by the 5-HT2AR. Furthermore we demonstrate that PLD1 specifically co-immunoprecipitates with the receptor and binds to a distal site in GST (glutathione transferase) fusion protein constructs of its C-terminal tail which is distinct from the ARF-interaction site, thereby suggesting the existence of a functional ARF-PLD signalling complex directly associated with this receptor. This reveals the spatial co-ordination of an important GPCR, transducer and effector into a physical complex that is likely to reinforce the impact of receptor activation on a heterotrimeric G-protein-independent signalling pathway. Signalling of this receptor through such non-canonical pathways may be important to its role in particular disorders.