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The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde research outputs.

Strathprints serves world leading Open Access research by the University of Strathclyde, including research by the Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences (SIPBS), where research centres such as the Industrial Biotechnology Innovation Centre (IBioIC), the Cancer Research UK Formulation Unit, SeaBioTech and the Centre for Biophotonics are based.

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A simple model of cortical dynamics explains variability and state dependence of sensory responses in urethane-anesthetized auditory cortex

Curto, Carina and Sakata, Shuzo and Marguet, Stephan and Itskov, Vladimir and Harris, Kenneth D (2009) A simple model of cortical dynamics explains variability and state dependence of sensory responses in urethane-anesthetized auditory cortex. Journal of Neuroscience, 29 (34). pp. 10600-10612.

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Abstract

The responses of neocortical cells to sensory stimuli are variable and state dependent. It has been hypothesized that intrinsic cortical dynamics play an important role in trial-to-trial variability; the precise nature of this dependence, however, is poorly understood. We show here that in auditory cortex of urethane-anesthetized rats, population responses to click stimuli can be quantitatively predicted on a trial-by-trial basis by a simple dynamical system model estimated from spontaneous activity immediately preceding stimulus presentation. Changes in cortical state correspond consistently to changes in model dynamics, reflecting a nonlinear, self-exciting system in synchronized states and an approximately linear system in desynchronized states. We propose that the complex and state-dependent pattern of trial-to-trial variability can be explained by a simple principle: sensory responses are shaped by the same intrinsic dynamics that govern ongoing spontaneous activity.