Picture of wind turbine against blue sky

Open Access research with a real impact...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde research outputs.

The Energy Systems Research Unit (ESRU) within Strathclyde's Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering is producing Open Access research that can help society deploy and optimise renewable energy systems, such as wind turbine technology.

Explore wind turbine research in Strathprints

Explore all of Strathclyde's Open Access research content

New teachers' perspectives on continuing professional development : accountability or professional growth

Purdon, Aileen (2001) New teachers' perspectives on continuing professional development : accountability or professional growth. Scottish Educational Review, 33 (2). pp. 110-122. ISSN 0141-9072

[img] Microsoft Word (Purdon (2001) SER)
Text_for_PURE.doc - Accepted Author Manuscript
License: Unspecified

Download (99kB)

Abstract

This article explores new teachers’ views on the purpose and benefits of continuing professional development (CPD) and considers the resulting implications for a national framework. It is based on a study carried out during 1999/2000 in which a sample of new teachers were asked about their perceptions of teacher professionalism and their attitudes to CPD. The study was set within the context of the developing role of the General Teaching Council for Scotland (GTC Scotland), although it also has implications for other educational bodies and institutions in Scotland. While the study provided some interesting insights into the views of this particular group, it also highlighted the fact that the new teachers involved had had few opportunities to engage with debate on professionalism and CPD. The article therefore concludes that if the post-McCrone education community is to foster a climate of trust, respect and collegiality that encourages talented new recruits to enter and stay in teaching then access to, and participation in, professional debate must be seen as fundamental aspects of the professional role.