Picture of person typing on laptop with programming code visible on the laptop screen

World class computing and information science research at Strathclyde...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Department of Computer & Information Sciences involved in mathematically structured programming, similarity and metric search, computer security, software systems, combinatronics and digital health.

The Department also includes the iSchool Research Group, which performs leading research into socio-technical phenomena and topics such as information retrieval and information seeking behaviour.

Explore

Stability of habitual physical activity and sedentary behaviour monitoring by accelerometry in 6-8 year olds

Basterfield, L and Adamson, A.J. and Pearce, M.S. and Reilly, John J (2011) Stability of habitual physical activity and sedentary behaviour monitoring by accelerometry in 6-8 year olds. Journal of Physical Activity and Health, 8 (4). pp. 543-547. ISSN 1543-3080

Full text not available in this repository. Request a copy from the Strathclyde author

Abstract

Accelerometry is rapidly becoming the instrument of choice for measuring physical activity in children. However, as limited data exist on the minimum number of days accelerometry required to provide a reliable estimate of habitual physical activity, we aimed to quantify the number of days of recording required to estimate both habitual physical activity and habitual sedentary behavior in primary school children. We measured physical activity and sedentary behavior over 7 days in 291 6-8 year olds using Actigraph accelerometers. Between-day intraclass reliability coefficients were calculated and averaged across all combinations of days. Although reliability increased with time, 3 days of recording provided reliabilities for volume of activity, moderate-vigorous intensity activity and sedentary behavior of 68%, 71% and 73% respectively. For our sample and setting, 3 days accelerometry provided reliable estimates of the main constructs of physical activity and sedentary behavior.