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Temperature dependence of the interfacial shear strength in glass–fibre polypropylene composites

Thomason, James and Yang, Liu (2011) Temperature dependence of the interfacial shear strength in glass–fibre polypropylene composites. Composites Science and Technology, 71 (13). pp. 1600-1605. ISSN 0266-3538

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Thomason_JL_Pure_Temperature_dependence_of_the_interfacial_shear_strength_in_glass_fibre_polypropylenen_composites_Jul_2011Temperature_CST_Revised_paper_July2011.doc - Preprint

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The present work focuses on further investigation of the hypothesis that a significant fraction of the level of apparent IFSS in glass fibre-reinforced thermoplastic composites can be attributed to a combination of thermal residual stress and static friction at the fibre-polymer interface. In order to obtain information on the temperature dependence of glass fibre – polypropylene IFSS a thermo-mechanical analyser has been adapted to enable interfacial microbond testing to be carried out in a well controlled temperature environment. Test results obtained by TMA-microbond testing showed excellent comparability with those obtained by normal microbond testing. The temperature dependence of IFSS of glass fibre – polypropylene was measured in the range from -40°C up to 100°C. The IFSS showed a highly significant inverse dependence on testing temperature with a major increase in the glass transition region of the PP matrix. It is shown that approximately 70% of the apparent room temperature IFSS in this system can be attributed to residual radial compressive stress at the fibre-matrix interface.