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The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by Strathclyde researchers, including by researchers from the Physical Activity for Health Group based within the School of Psychological Sciences & Health. Research here seeks to better understand how and why physical activity improves health, gain a better understanding of the amount, intensity, and type of physical activity needed for health benefits, and evaluate the effect of interventions to promote physical activity.

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Oxidative stress in fungal fermentation processes : the roles of alternative respiration

Li, Q. and Bai, Z. and O'Donnell, A. and Harvey, L. M. and Hoskisson, P. A. and McNeil, B. (2011) Oxidative stress in fungal fermentation processes : the roles of alternative respiration. Biotechnology Letters, 33 (3). pp. 457-467. ISSN 0141-5492

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Abstract

Filamentous fungi are arguably the most industrially important group of microorganisms. Production processes involving these simple eukaryotes are often highly aerobic in nature, which implies these cultures are routinely subject to oxidative stress. Despite this, little is known about how filamentous fungi cope with high levels of oxidative stress as experienced in fermenter systems. More surprisingly, much of our knowledge of oxidative stress responses in fungi comes from environmental or medical studies. Here, the current understanding of oxidative stress effects and cellular responses in filamentous fungi is critically discussed. In particular the role of alternative respiration is evaluated, and the contributions of the alternative oxidase and alternative dehydrogenases in defence against oxidative stress, and their profound influence on fungal metabolism is critically examined. Finally, the importance of further research which would underpin a less empirical approach to optimising fungal strains for the fermenter environment is emphasised.