Picture of two heads

Open Access research that challenges the mind...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including those from the School of Psychological Sciences & Health - but also papers by researchers based within the Faculties of Science, Engineering, Humanities & Social Sciences, and from the Strathclyde Business School.

Discover more...

Laser accelerated ions and electron transport in ultra-intense laser matter interaction

Roth, M. and Brambrink, E. and Audebert, P. and Blazevic, A. and Clarke, R. and Cobble, J. and Cowan, T.E. and Fernandez, J. and Fuchs, J. and Geissel, M. and Habs, D. and Hegelich, M. and Karsch, S. and Ledingham, Kenneth and Neely, D. and Ruhl, H. and Schlegel, T. and Schreiber, J. (2005) Laser accelerated ions and electron transport in ultra-intense laser matter interaction. Laser and Particle Beams, 23 (1). pp. 95-100. ISSN 0263-0346

Full text not available in this repository. (Request a copy from the Strathclyde author)

Abstract

Since their discovery, laser accelerated ion beams have been the subject of great interest. The ion beam peak power and beam emittance is unmatched by any conventionally accelerated ion beam. Due to the unique quality, a wealth of applications has been proposed, and the first experiments confirmed their prospects. Laser ion acceleration is strongly linked to the generation and transport of hot electrons by the interaction of ultra-intense laser light with matter. Comparing ion acceleration experiments at laser systems with different beam parameters and using targets of varying thickness, material and temperature, some insight on the underlying physics can be obtained. The paper will present experimental results obtained at different laser systems, first beam quality measurement on laser accelerated heavy ions, and ion beam source size measurements at different laser parameters. Using structured targets, we compare information obtained from micro patterned ion beams about the accelerating electron sheath, and the influence of magnetic fields on the electron transport inside conducting targets.