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The new standards framework for Scottish teachers: facilitating or constraining reflective practice?

Christie, Donald (2006) The new standards framework for Scottish teachers: facilitating or constraining reflective practice? Reflective Practice, 7 (2). pp. 265-276. ISSN 1462-3943

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Abstract

This article describes the development of the new framework of professional standards for Scottish teachers as an attempt to enhance professional learning and development and promote a model of extended professionalism within which reflective practice is a clear expectation. In particular, it focuses on the derivation of the standard through a four-stage research process that yielded a model of chartered teacher comprising four principal elements: professional values and commitments; professional knowledge and understanding; professional attributes; and abilities and professional action. The model is discussed and its implications for reflective practice are examined. The idea that defining professional standards may serve to facilitate rather than constrain professional development is not uncontested. However, the article argues that professional standards, defined authentically to reflect the voices of teachers, can indeed foster reflective practice and that the current professional context in Scotland provides opportunities which may facilitate the development of collaborative forms of reflective teaching.