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Raptor packets: a packet-centric approach to distributed raptor code design

Stefanovic, C. and Stankovic, Vladimir and Stojakovic, M. and Vukobratovic, Dejan (2009) Raptor packets: a packet-centric approach to distributed raptor code design. In: Information Theory, 2009. ISIT 2009. IEEE International Symposium on. IEEE, pp. 2336-2340. ISBN 978-1-4244-4312-3

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Abstract

In this paper, we address the problem of distributed Raptor code design over information packets located across the network nodes. We propose a novel approach to this problem that consists of generating, encoding and dispersing Raptor packets across the network. Unlike recent node-centric proposals, where network nodes are responsible for collecting information packets and performing Raptor encoding, in the proposed packet-centric approach this task is assigned to Raptor packets. In a two-step encoding procedure that corresponds to precoding and LT-coding step of standard Raptor encoding, Raptor packets randomly traverse the network, collect and encode sufficient number of information packets following exactly a given degree distribution, and finish their paths in a random network node. The efficiency of the distributed Raptor coding scheme is confirmed by simulation results, where their performance is demonstrated to approach closely the performance of standard (centralized) Raptor codes.