Picture of flying drone

Award-winning sensor signal processing research at Strathclyde...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including by Strathclyde researchers involved in award-winning research into technology for detecting drones. - but also other internationally significant research from within the Department of Electronic & Electrical Engineering.

Strathprints also exposes world leading research from the Faculties of Science, Engineering, Humanities & Social Sciences, and from the Strathclyde Business School.

Discover more...

Radiation pressure and momentum transfer in dielectrics: The photon drag effect

Loudon, R and Barnett, S M and Baxter, C (2005) Radiation pressure and momentum transfer in dielectrics: The photon drag effect. Physical Review A, 71 (6). -. ISSN 1094-1622

Full text not available in this repository. (Request a copy from the Strathclyde author)

Abstract

The momentum transfer from light to a dielectric material in the photon drag effect is calculated by evaluation of the relevant Lorentz force. In accordance with measurements on Si and Ge, the material is taken as a two-component optical system, with charge carriers described by an extinction coefficient kappa in a host semiconductor described by real refractive indices eta(p) (phase) and eta(g) (group). The calculated momentum transfer to the charge carriers alone has the value eta(p)h omega/c per photon, the so-called Minkowski value, found experimentally. The time-dependent Lorentz force is calculated for light in the form of a narrow-band single-photon pulse. When the pulse is much shorter than the attenuation length, which is much shorter than the sample thickness, there is a clear separation in time between surface and bulk contributions to the forces. The total bulk momentum transfer (charges plus host) in this case is found to be h omega/eta(g)c, the so-called Abraham value.