Picture of two heads

Open Access research that challenges the mind...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including those from the School of Psychological Sciences & Health - but also papers by researchers based within the Faculties of Science, Engineering, Humanities & Social Sciences, and from the Strathclyde Business School.

Discover more...

Regional electrophysiological effects of left ventricular hypertrophy in isolated rabbit hearts under normal and ischaemic conditions

Wolk, R and Sneddon, K P and Dempster, J and Kane, K A and Cobbe, S M and Hicks, M N (2000) Regional electrophysiological effects of left ventricular hypertrophy in isolated rabbit hearts under normal and ischaemic conditions. Cardiovascular Research, 48 (1). pp. 120-128. ISSN 0008-6363

Full text not available in this repository. (Request a copy from the Strathclyde author)

Abstract

Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) has been reported to produce differential electrophysiological effects in isolated epicardial and endocardial cells. This study aimed to examine regional electrophysiological effects of LVH in normal and ischaemic conditions in the whole heart. LVH was secondary to perinephritis-induced hypertension. Monophasic action potential duration (MAPD(90)), effective refractory period (ERP) and conduction delay were measured in paced, isolated working rabbit hearts either at one right ventricular and two left ventricular sites (apical and basal epicardium) or at three left ventricular sites (apical and basal epicardium, apical: endocardium). The hearts were subjected to 30 min of regional ischaemia and 15 min of reperfusion. In non-ischaemic conditions, LVH produced uniform prolongation of MAPD(90) and ERP in the left ventricular epicardium, but not in the endocardium. After coronary artery occlusion, LVH significantly increased ischaemia-induced transepicardial dispersion of repolarisation, but not refractoriness. LVH did not affect arrhythmogenesis in either non-ischaemic or ischaemic conditions. Differential effects of LVH on epicardial and endocardial electrophysiological parameters are also observed in the whole heart. In addition, the sensitivity of hypertrophied myocardium to ischaemia is increased and leads to an increase in ischaemia-induced dispersion of repolarisation. However, neither dispersion of refractoriness nor arrhythmogenesis are affected by LVH in non-ischaemic or ischaemic conditions in this experimental model.