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Characterisation of nitride thin films by electron backscatter diffraction and electron channelling contrast imaging

Trager-Cowan, C. and Sweeney, F. and Winkelmann, A. and Wilkinson, A.J. and Trimby, P.W. and Day, A.P. and Gholinia, A. and Schmidt, N.H. and Parbrook, P.J. and Watson, I.M. (2006) Characterisation of nitride thin films by electron backscatter diffraction and electron channelling contrast imaging. Materials Science and Technology, 22 (11). 1352-1358(7). ISSN 0267-0836

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Abstract

In the present paper the authors describe the use of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) mapping and electron channelling contrast imaging (in the scanning electron microscope) to study tilt, strain, atomic steps and dislocations in epitaxial GaN thin films. Results from epitaxial GaN thin films and from a just coalesced epitaxial laterally overgrown GaN thin film are shown. From the results it is deduced that EBSD may be used to measure orientation changes of the order of 0·02° and strain changes of order 2 × 10−4 in GaN thin films. It is also demonstrated that channelling contrast in electron channelling contrast images may be used to image tilt, atomic steps and threading dislocations in GaN thin films. In addition the authors will consider the results of the first many-beam dynamical simulations of EBSD patterns from GaN thin films, in which the intensity distributions in the experimental patterns are accurately reproduced.