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Feeding back the results of dynamic assessment to the child

Landor, M. and Lauchlan, Fraser and Carrigan, D. and Kennedy, H. (2007) Feeding back the results of dynamic assessment to the child. International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 9 (4). pp. 346-353. ISSN 1754-9507

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Abstract

The primary objective of this research study was to investigate the perceived effects of feeding back the results of dynamic assessment to the child verbally and through the medium of video. Fourteen children, aged 6 – 11 years, and their class teachers were involved in the research. The children and teachers were interviewed prior to the DA session, and then again approximately 6 weeks after a feedback session. Thematic analysis was undertaken for coding and interpreting primary data, using both a computer software package QSR NVivo 7 and manual methods of sorting and categorizing. Results demonstrated that feeding back the results of dynamic assessment to the child led to perceptions of positive change from both teachers and children, and that using video to feedback is particularly helpful. A number of methodological strengths and weaknesses are discussed, and implications for practice are explored. Further research, building on this study, could explore the outcomes of the educational psychologist consulting with the child about their perceptions of the support they require, rather than only feeding back assessment results to them. This could lead to the child being involved at the start of the assessment and intervention cycle, leading to their greater engagement with the change process.