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Behaviour of compacted silt used to construct flood embankment

El Mountassir, G. and Sanchez, M. and Romero, E. and Soemitro, R. A. A. (2011) Behaviour of compacted silt used to construct flood embankment. Proceedings of the ICE - Geotechnical Engineering, 164 (3). pp. 195-210.

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Abstract

This paper investigates the unsaturated mechanical behaviour of a fill material sampled from flood embankments located along the Bengawan Solo River in Indonesia. In order to gain a better understanding of this fill material, in situ tests were carried out alongside an extensive laboratory programme. Two different phenomena related to changes in moisture content of the embankment fill material are experimentally studied herein: (a) volumetric collapse and (b) variation in shear strength with suction. At low densities, similar to those found in situ, the material exhibited significant volumetric collapse behaviour. Triaxial tests carried out under saturated, suction-controlled and constant water content conditions indicate that the shear strength of the material increased with suction; in particular the effective angle of friction increased from 24.9 degrees under saturated conditions to 35.8 degrees under air-dried conditions.