Picture of aircraft jet engine

Strathclyde research that powers aerospace engineering...

The Strathprints institutional repository is a digital archive of University of Strathclyde's Open Access research outputs. Strathprints provides access to thousands of Open Access research papers by University of Strathclyde researchers, including by Strathclyde researchers involved in aerospace engineering and from the Advanced Space Concepts Laboratory - but also other internationally significant research from within the Department of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering. Discover why Strathclyde is powering international aerospace research...

Strathprints also exposes world leading research from the Faculties of Science, Engineering, Humanities & Social Sciences, and from the Strathclyde Business School.

Discover more...

All-optical delay line based on a cavity soliton laser with injection

McIntyre, C. and Yao, A. M. and Oppo, G. -L. and Prati, F. and Tissoni, G. (2010) All-optical delay line based on a cavity soliton laser with injection. Physical Review A, 81 (1). 013838. ISSN 1094-1622

Full text not available in this repository. (Request a copy from the Strathclyde author)

Abstract

The motion and position of cavity solitons in a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser with optical injection are investigated. Spatial variations of the phase of the injected field are considered in the form of sinusoidal and triangular modulations. We show how the velocity, distance traveled, and final position of the cavity solitons can be controlled by varying the slope of the phase modulations and the response time of the semiconductor medium. Numerical simulations demonstrate the feasibility of an all-optical delay line in a cavity soliton laser. Merging of cavity solitons is observed when they collide at modulation maxima and is shown to be beneficial in the operation of the delay line. The merging and consequent emission of pulsed and localized light is explained in terms of violation of energy balance for soliton systems in the presence of injection and dissipation.